Baby in a Box

We occasionally take peeks at Finland at work, because of their excellent performance (and Sweden’s, and Norway’s) in child-health and early child development. It’s therefore rather heartening to see the attention they have been receiving from the media, on account of these same achievements.

This is the latest story to break about easy and inexpensive public healthcare measures to ensure better national performance in child health. I disagree with the glib ‘equal start’ comment, but overlooking pink-hearty journalism, I’d say it’s quite a smart move, wouldn’t you?

For 75 years, Finland’s expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It’s like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world’s lowest infant mortality rates.

It’s a tradition that dates back to the 1930s and it’s designed to give all children in Finland, no matter what background they’re from, an equal start in life.

The maternity package – a gift from the government – is available to all expectant mothers.

It contains bodysuits, a sleeping bag, outdoor gear, bathing products for the baby, as well as nappies, bedding and a small mattress. [Full list of boxed goodies available on the original link.]

With the mattress in the bottom, the box becomes a baby’s first bed. Many children, from all social backgrounds, have their first naps within the safety of the box’s four cardboard walls.

[The scheme was universalised in 1949] “Not only was it offered to all mothers-to-be but new legislation meant in order to get the grant, or maternity box, they had to visit a doctor or municipal pre-natal clinic before their fourth month of pregnancy,” says Heidi Liesivesi, who works at Kela – the Social Insurance Institution of Finland.

So the box provided mothers with what they needed to look after their baby, but it also helped steer pregnant women into the arms of the doctors and nurses of Finland’s nascent welfare state. In the 1930s Finland was a poor country and infant mortality was high – 65 out of 1,000 babies died. But the figures improved rapidly in the decades that followed.

“And baby’s in a boxy, faaast asleep”.
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